WorldCrops - World Crops for the Northeastern United States

New Zealand Spinach Tetragonia tetragoniodes

New Zealand spinach on a farm in Costa Rica. (Photo by Frank Mangan)

New Zealand spinach, as its name implies, is indigenous to New Zealand. It resembles spinach (Spinacia oleracea), but its growth habits are very different. Unlike Spinacia oleracea, New Zealand spinach tolerates high temperatures (up to 95┬░ F) and is killed by a frost.

It is due to this heat tolerance that New Zealand spinach is grown in parts of the tropical Americas. As is the case with Spinacia oleracea, leaves and shoots are harvested and boiled or used fresh in salads.

New Zealand spinach on a farm in Costa Rica. (Photo by Frank Mangan)

Production
Seeds are planted 12 to 16 inches apart in rows 30 to 40 inches apart. Harvesting can begin 40-50 days after planting.

New Zealnad spinach at terminal market in Sao Paulo, Brazil. (Photo by Frank Mangan)

Seed Sources
There are many companies that sell New Zealand spinach.


A collaborative project produced by: Rutgers Cooperative Extension, UMASS Extension, and Cornell Cooperative ExtensionSponsored in part by: RMA and Northeast Region SARE
WorldCrops - World Crops for the Northeastern United States